How to establish a kick-ass morning routine to get shit done – Part 3

In this final part of the series, I’m going to cover how you can stack up your habits one on top of the other so that it builds up into a morning routine and becomes effortless at the same time.

If you’ve somehow missed the earlier articles, click part one or part two to read them now.

Now to have a really powerful morning routine, it’s imperative that you wake up early enough to do the things that matter to you. So like it or not, you need to build up the habit of waking up on time. That means building up a habit of NOT hitting the snooze button.

If you’ve been spending the last 20 odd years of your life hitting the snooze button ever since you have been attending school, this part might probably be the hardest step to overcome.

With a strong enough why, this can be done. Even before you begin, you must know why establishing a morning routine is important for you. How can your life change if you have an additional 2-4 hours in the morning just for yourself? What would you do with that time?

If you secretly answered ‘sleep’, you’re not alone haha. I’ve been there too. Although it doesn’t change your life much.

For me, the morning routine meant I had more time to reflect on my day.

It meant I had more time to write my book

It meant I had more time to catch up on my emails

It meant I had more time to do work that was important instead of urgent.

Sometimes we get so caught up in the busyness of life that we hardly have time to work on the important things because we are constantly chasing urgent timelines.

If you are a parent, maybe waking up early means more time with your children or spouse.

If you are single, maybe waking up early means more time to invest in finding that soul mate of yours online.

If you’re a business owner, maybe waking up early means being able to network at key events that happen in the morning.

Phase One

  1. Identify what time you want to sleep.
  2. Identify how many hours you need to sleep daily
  3. Identify what time you want to wake up.
  4. Identify what activities you want to focus on during your morning routine

Phase Two

Practice waking up on time for at least three months. I started with 7am and worked backwards and decided to fix on 4am. This is the hardest part but also the key ingredient to master in your morning routine. There is NO morning routine if you don’t wake up on time. Waking up in the morning is your keystone habit.

Phase Three

Stack habits up one after the other. Once you’ve conquered waking up and you are comfortable waking up at a specific time everyday/weekday, you can focus on the activities you want to complete. Don’t make it random. That will only confuse yourself. Start compounding the actions one month at a time.

If you’ve always wanted to exercise, plan that in after the first month.

If you’ve always wanted to meditate, plan that in after the second month.

If you’ve always wanted to cook healthy breakfast, plan that in after the third month

If you’ve always wanted to spend some time reading a book, plan that in after the fourth month.

If you’ve always wanted to be active on social media, plan that in after the fifth month

If you’ve always wanted to write that blog, plan that in after the sixth month

If you’ve always wanted to record videos and start your own YouTube channel, work on that after the seventh month.

If you’ve wanted to detox your data storage on your phone by deleting your pictures/videos on a regular basis, then do that on your eighth month.

Eventually, you will create the domino effect.

You will see yourself kicking ass every morning, working on the most important things that matter to you.

When you change one behaviour, other behaviours also shift. They begin to link up with one another.

Waking up early means I get time to write.

Once I complete writing, I can focus on my run.

Once I complete my run, I can focus on my video.

Once I complete my video, I can focus on meditation

Over time, you build commitment and consistency. Remember to focus on completing one action in it’s entirety before moving on to the next. It shouldn’t be a difficult thing. If it is, break it down into a smaller action.

The key is to keep up your momentum without biting off more than what you can chew.

Slow and Steady wins this race.

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